Hello, my name is

Bobby Jr.!

Age: Varries

Birthday: Varries

Sex: Male and Female

Favorite Food: Seeds and insects

Favorite Activity: Foraging for food

Species Info

Range/Habitat:  Northern Bobwhite are found in North America in central/eastern regions of the US and eastern Mexico.  They live in open forests and grasslands. 

Behavior:  Bobwhites are very social animals and form groups, or coveys, or up to 20 individuals. They forage and roost in their coveys. When foraging, Bobwhites scratch at leaf litter to look for seeds, plants matter, and insects. In the fall/winter, they eat more seeds, in the spring leafy greens, and in the summer more fruits and arthropods. 

Breeding:  Male and Female Bobwhites can mate with multiple partners in one breeding season. They lay 7-28 eggs per clutch and can have multiple broods in one breeding season. The hatchlings are precocial, or well developed, and can immediately begin following their mothers. However, they do rely on their mother to feed them and keep them warm for several weeks. 

Conservation:   Listing: Near Threatened. Bobwhite populations are steeply declining due to habitat loss and changes in agricultural practices. They are a well studied species due to their previous status as a game bird. Conservation organizations, hunters, and researchers formed the National Bobwhite Conservation Initiative to collaborate and improving Bobwhite populations. 

Range/Habitat: Northern Bobwhite are found in North America in central/eastern regions of the US and eastern Mexico.  They live in open forests and grasslands. 

Behavior: Bobwhites are very social animals and form groups, or coveys, or up to 20 individuals. They forage and roost in their coveys. When foraging, Bobwhites scratch at leaf litter to look for seeds, plants matter, and insects. In the fall/winter, they eat more seeds, in the spring leafy greens, and in the summer more fruits and arthropods. 

Breed: Male and Female Bobwhites can mate with multiple partners in one breeding season. They lay 7-28 eggs per clutch and can have multiple broods in one breeding season. The hatchlings are precocial, or well developed, and can immediately begin following their mothers. However, they do rely on their mother to feed them and keep them warm for several weeks. 

Conservation: Listing: Near Threatened. Bobwhite populations are steeply declining due to habitat loss and changes in agricultural practices. They are a well studied species due to their previous status as a game bird. Conservation organizations, hunters, and researchers formed the National Bobwhite Conservation Initiative to collaborate and improving Bobwhite populations. 





Their populations are in decline likely due to habitat degradation and urbanization. They are highly social birds and are found in groups (or conveys) of 3 to 20 individuals. Males normally get along with one another but will fight during the breeding season. Bobwhites have several breeding strategies including monogamous pairs, one female with multiple males, and one male with multiple females. They mostly eat seeds and leaves and supplement with insects during the breeding season. 

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